Summit Photo of NH Homepage

Jun 5 2012

Incessant Rain

Even in a state with such a vast tapestry of incredible landscapes, there is a serious problem of opportunities when rain falls the way it has been for the last few weeks. Rain in small doses is a very good thing, but when it falls for a solid week at a rate of several inches per day, it causes all sorts of complications. Not to mention moodiness (it’s literally as if we’ve all begun to see the world in black, white, and grey). Nevertheless, as a part of my continuing series on waterfalls, I thought I’d share a few quick tips and thoughts related to rain and waterfall photography.

Too much rain can be a bad thing when it comes to photographing waterfalls, but not all waterfalls. While most falls can prove difficult to shoot when there’s too much water, some falls are normally so dry that the only time to photograph them is after a good rain. Places like Tucker Brook Falls and the Shannon Brook waterfall system are great examples of this. Usually the bigger the waterfall or the drier the area, the better it is to have some good rain before the shoot.

If you plan to venture out in the rain, consider your equipment. Very few photographs will ever fetch enough money to pay for a new camera, so keep this firmly in mind when you’re looking out the window at the torrents and jonesing for a shoot. If you insist, however, I recommend the following equipment:

-Pack Cover for your camera bag/pack
-Dry Stuff Sack for your camera body
-Rain Sleeve to shoot in the rain
-Spare camp towel or two for various uses
-Camera Cleaning kit including lens tissues

Rain Sleeve for Camera

Rain Sleeve for Camera

Dry Stuff Sack

Dry Stuff Sack - Your Best Friend

Camp Towel

Camp Towel

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have an unfortunate mishap, try putting the camera (minus the batteries) onto a cookie sheet and into the oven on super low heat for about an hour. I’ve never had to do it, but a buddy of mine did after taking a tumble and falling into a swamp with his camera. Also, you can try the old bag-of-rice trick.

Be ready for some great things after this rain stops, too. Opportunities will abound for journalism of damage caused by flooding, uber-green landscapes, wandering wildlife, lupine in Sugar Hill, and perhaps even a touch of snow on Mount Washington given this stubborn low pressure system. Oh, and a few great waterfalls will be showing off their fury. Make a plan to hit the trails once this moisture breaks up and you’re sure to not be disappointed!

Thanks for joining me and be sure to come back again for more information about hiking and photographing New Hampshire’s amazing landscapes! Be well!


Jan 27 2012

Best Images of 2011

Photography in the White Mountains is nothing short of incredible. While it may lack the authority and prestige of places like Yellowstone, I have found it to be the perfect place to connect with nature, with one’s inner artist and with a child-like sense of adventure; all at once. As a life-long Granite Stater, my connection to White Mountains is stark, and my memory is filled with scenes of hiking through deep woods and scaling ledges of granite. As a photographer, I am quite fortunate to be engaged in the creation of an enhanced record of those memories. With regard those meaningful recollections, I’ve decided to start an annual tradition where I look back on the year in hiking and in photography.

First, a short compendium of the year. 2011 started off normally enough with deep cold (I was out in -22 in Jefferson one morning), but seemed to stray off course from the normal weather patterns as the year went on. By the end of the summer, we faced Tropical Storm Irene which devastated homes, business, and hiking trails. Irene also set the tone for one of the most peculiar fall foliage seasons in recent memory. Autumn never really seemed to find its rhythm in the valleys, and one had to travel to the brutal Alpine Tundras to find deep colour. Soon after, winter made cameo appearances the day before Halloween and the day before Thanksgiving, each time dumping well over a foot of snow in some areas. After that, winter never seemed to completely show up in normal fashion. 2011 ended much drier than anyone could have expected, and stick-season (a term we photographers use to refer to the in-between seasons) seemed to never go away.

Despite the challenges there were pockets of brilliance that I was fortunate to be witness to. To that end, I’ve picked my ten eleven best photographs from the year to share with you one last time as we say hello to 2012!

Winters Dusk on Washington

Winter's Dusk on Washington

Presidential Alpenglow

Presidential Alpenglow

Chocorua Alpenglow

Chocorua Alpenglow

Cloudland Before Irene

Cloudland: Before Irene

Pemigewassett Sunset

Pemigewassett Sunset

glen ellis falls

Glen Ellis Falls

Tuckerman Mystique

Tuckerman Mystique

Ripley Falls

Ripley Falls

September Color and Clarity

September Color and Clarity

Thompson Falls

Autumn at Thompson Falls

Franconia Ridge Autumnal Sunset

Franconia Ridge Autumnal Sunset

Beyond a doubt, in photography (as with other aspects of life) it is an important and useful exercise to reflect back every now and then. Picking the best landscape photographs from the past year’s collection helps photographers to allow for the necessary time to feel good about their efforts and their results. This can then help to establish a baseline for the new year, and for new goals. I look forward to sharing more images and experiences with you as we dive right in to 2012.

Take care.


Nov 19 2011

5 Canvases on Sale for Black Friday!

This year, Gallery-Wrapped Canvases have become insanely popular! I truly believe that there is no better way to display great works of New Hampshire art than on canvas! Here’s a bit more information…

What is a gallery wrapped canvas?

    It is a high quality print on an artist’s canvas.
    The canvas is stretched over custom-made wood stretcher bars.
    It is available in any size with a depth of 1.5″ or 2.5″.

What’s so cool about gallery wrapped canvases?

    Canvases make a bold statement.
    They appear to float on your wall.
    They don’t need a frame; the structure is inside the art.

Here are FIVE canvases that I’m releasing for Black Friday Weekend starting on Wednesday the 23rd (read on, there’s MORE)!!:

Tuckerman Mystique

Living Room

Picture A Canvas In Your Space!

To order, simply click any of the images above, or feel free to email me directly and I’ll take care of everything for you!

Pro Tip: You’ll receive a 15% DISCOUNT if you enter the code ILOVENH at the checkout!! Now THAT is a heck of a deal! Specials start on Wednesday, November 23rd and are good through Sunday at 11:59pm (which ought to cover the Black Friday spread)!

Happy shopping, my fellow travelers!


Oct 17 2011

How’s the Foliage?

A few weeks back, my two year old son and I were in the car, making our way home. Out of nowhere, he says to me, “Daddy, are the trees okay?”

At such an innocent remark, I was at once filled with an inner smile at his skilled observation, and further made to confront the reality of this unusually edentulated season. While I could have gone on for a lengthy while with a calculated explanation about what makes the leaves look so different, I opted for something a bit more concise, and age appropriate. I remarked, “The leaves are OK, Carter. I know they look different, but this happens every year! Pretty neat, huh?”

He agreed, and then I went on to ask him what colors he saw. It took me by little surprise that the first color he mentioned was not yellow, most certainly was not red, nor orange. It was brown. So far this year, it has been a tough fall.

Although the fall usually portrays itself in endless romance at the hands of the skilled and naturally connected photographer, this year’s perennial change left many pictures untaken. It should be noted, nonetheless, that the sparse clearings of rain and the occasional departure of the seventy-degree days most certainly allowed some pieces of the fall symphony to play on. The usual autumnal winds most certainly touched the land and the trees, strumming the overgrown blades of dry grass and the confusedly browning leaves at once, as if fingers strummed along a guitar. Although many of us stopped to watch, and the trees occasionally swayed in concert as if they too were awaiting the most grand part of the act, fall here never quite hit its crescendo.

It should be noted, however, that there were plentiful scenes of a unique nature that formed at the hands of such a peculiar fall season. I have seen many terrific examples of this in the work of others, and in my own work I discovered that the fragile alpine tundra still offered a most stunning show, sans the abundance of tall and deciduous trees. Those works that I created from above the more popular timbers have already been shared, and I won’t share them again, no matter how jovially I regard them. However, I felt it necessary to take this moment to share a few other fall foliage images that have yet gone unseen. While these ones were not among my “favorites” from the season, I feel they do capture the fall, as it were, this year. I should also mention that there is still opportunity for some great late-fall shooting, and I fully plan to partake if I am able to find the time!

Foliage in Zealand Notch

Foliage in Zealand Notch

Foliage Confusion

Foliage Confusion

Whiteface & Passaconaway

Whiteface & Passaconaway at Sunrise

Gibbs Falls

Gibbs Falls, Crawford Notch

The haunting thoughts of my limited time here on earth shape my travels and inspire my art. It can be said that when you begin to measure life by things like semesters, seasons, fiscal quarters, as we Americans tend to like to…well, it goes by awful quick. There is so much to capture…yet there is so little time. Thank you for taking the time today to stop by my New Hampshire Landscape Photography blog; until next time, take care.